paalangpu-sihu:

Five-year-old Malachi Wilson was all set to start kindergarten at F.J. Young Elementary in Seminole, Texas, but on Monday he was told to cut his hair and was sent home. His mother, April Wilson, contacted the Navajo Nation; the American Indian Movement also put pressure on the district to reverse its decision against the child. Only after she provided documentation of her son’s Native-ness through Malachi’s Certificate of Indian Blood did the Seminole Independent School District change its mind. The district’s rather lengthy student dress code stipulates more than a dozen rules when it comes to hair. Among them, Mohawks are prohibited. (Mohawks are called that for the way that some actual Mohawk people wear their hair.) Dreadlocks are also prohibited. The handbook says exceptions are made on “certain recognized religious or spiritual beliefs,” but students “must receive prior approval by the campus administrator.” The district changed its mind about Wilson’s hair—but he nevertheless missed his first day of school. The school district is ostensibly named for the Seminole people. The district’s schools use various Native mascots, and refer to their students as “Indians and Maidens.”

………………………………………..

(via aprairiehomecomrade)

Britney, for some reason… something tells me you might enjoy this.

Britney, for some reason… something tells me you might enjoy this.

(Source: zooeyclairedeschanel, via tinyshell)

buggirl:

Beneficial Bug of the Day:   Minute Pirate Bug: Orius spp
These small Hemipteran bugs are commonly found in gardens.  They feed on a wide variety or garden/crop pests, making them beneficial as biological control agents.  They stab their prey with their piercing mouth part, and insert digestive saliva into their victim so they can suck up the juices.  Gross way to die, but good for the ecosystem. 
Make a difference in science! Pledge a dollar here!

Ughhhh last fall/winter I worked in a soybean aphid lab. Some of our cages had mesh that wasn’t fine enough to prevent the entry of parasitic wasps. THEN some of our samples from the field had Orius eggs/nymphs so I had a pirate bug problem for a bit.
I am probably the only person who likes aphids. And is upset when things eat my aphids. Except when they’re lady beetles, that is. Nothing is more entertaining than a lady beetle larva going nommmm destroyyy nom to an aphid.

… anyways. >.>

buggirl:

Beneficial Bug of the Day:   Minute Pirate Bug: Orius spp

These small Hemipteran bugs are commonly found in gardens.  They feed on a wide variety or garden/crop pests, making them beneficial as biological control agents.  They stab their prey with their piercing mouth part, and insert digestive saliva into their victim so they can suck up the juices.  Gross way to die, but good for the ecosystem. 

Make a difference in science! Pledge a dollar here!

Ughhhh last fall/winter I worked in a soybean aphid lab. Some of our cages had mesh that wasn’t fine enough to prevent the entry of parasitic wasps. THEN some of our samples from the field had Orius eggs/nymphs so I had a pirate bug problem for a bit.

I am probably the only person who likes aphids. And is upset when things eat my aphids. Except when they’re lady beetles, that is. Nothing is more entertaining than a lady beetle larva going nommmm destroyyy nom to an aphid.

… anyways. >.>

nateswinehart:

Being good to each other is so important, guys.

(via minuiko)

wapiti3:

Frank Melchior Photos on Flickr.
Palouse

Hmm, yesterday I was thinking about moving to Maine, now today I want to be back on the Palouse.

wapiti3:

Frank Melchior Photos on Flickr.

Palouse

Hmm, yesterday I was thinking about moving to Maine, now today I want to be back on the Palouse.

cubebreaker: In his series, The Good Badlands, photographer Guy Tal seeks to show us that though it is often hidden, and may only appear briefly, there is delicate and subtle beauty in abundance for any viewer with patience and desire.

(via phobs-heh)

inlandwest:

The best magazine about the west, High Country News, is having another photo contest:

The High Country News photo contest is seeking new takes on familiar subjects. We’d like to see your approach to the modern American West. Photographs should highlight the unique qualities of the West as it stands today – its new communities, resources, economies and geographies.

                      People - Landscape - Wildlife

……….. go enter your photos (I did and I am making textless do it too!)

Voting starts September 1st!

rovinglovers:

sleepy

damegreywulf:

trust:

i want a relationship but i want them to be like a friend to me, i dont want the relationship to be all about kissing, making out and sex i just wanna hang out with them, and go places, and just have fun wherever we go

This post is surreal because that is exactly how a healthy relationship should be yet we’re convinced this is a weird and unusual thing to ask of our partners.

psst quercus, coincidentally we discussed this earlier?

(Source: trust, via unleashbryan)

portraits-of-america:

     “I would have never thought that my mom would accomplish what she has in her life. She was very, very poor when she came from the Dominican Republic. I was born in a shelter while my father was locked up in jail. My mom had me in her belly while she was going to college—and she still made honor roll. She had to take time off from school at one point to take care of the three of us, and she actually graduated from college the same day I graduated from high school. That lady is just ridiculous. Watching her do all those things instilled in me the mindset that anything is possible: if I wanted something, I went after it. I always thought, ‘If she could do it, I can do it.’”
Bethlehem, PA

portraits-of-america:

     “I would have never thought that my mom would accomplish what she has in her life. She was very, very poor when she came from the Dominican Republic. I was born in a shelter while my father was locked up in jail. My mom had me in her belly while she was going to college—and she still made honor roll. She had to take time off from school at one point to take care of the three of us, and she actually graduated from college the same day I graduated from high school. That lady is just ridiculous. Watching her do all those things instilled in me the mindset that anything is possible: if I wanted something, I went after it. I always thought, ‘If she could do it, I can do it.’”

Bethlehem, PA